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From The Back Page To The Front Room

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From The Back Page To The Front Room

9.99 12.99
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The media dominates our lives, sport dominates the media, football dominates the sports media. This book explores the impact this powerful relationship has had on our culture and society.

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The media dominates our lives, sport dominates the media, football dominates the sports media. This book explores the impact this powerful relationship has had on our culture and society.

By Roger Domeneghetti

The media dominates our lives. Sport dominates the media. Football dominates the sports media.If we're not watching the beautiful game on television, then we're listening to it on the radio. If we're not reading about it, then we're tweeting about it. If we're not betting in-play, then we're pretending to be football managers. We can access goals from every corner of the globe whenever and wherever we want, yet by comparison few of us watch a match live. From the Back Page to the Front Room explains how football and the media have become indistinguishable, fundamentally altering fans' relationship with the game in the process. Starting in the days of folk football, Roger Domeneghetti traces the sport's journey through early newspapers, radio, newsreels, the growth of televised football and on into the internet age. Along the way he explores the impact this powerful partnership has had on our culture and society. Based on exhaustive research and exclusive interviews with key figures including Greg Dyke, Henry Winter, Jacqui Oatley, Jonathan Wilson and Hope Powell, From the Back Page to the Front Room is a fascinating account of how football and the media helped each other dominate modern life. It is also a window into a world where we can now watch on our phones what once barely merited a few lines in the Press.

'Witty, Masterful and intelligent... deserves to be the standard text on the subject' - The New Statesman

'A terrific piece of work' - The Guardian

'Hugely enjoyable and impressively researched...a terrific tour de force' - Independent on Sunday

'Outstandingly readable' - Paddy Barclay

'Exhaustively well-researched' - When Saturday Comes

'An unrivalled account... both informative and compelling' - Philosophy Football

'A study of tremendous readability and depth' - The International Journalof the History of Sport

Author Bio

Roger Domeneghetti is a lecturer in journalism at Northumbria University and author of the critically acclaimed 'From the Back Page to the Front Room: Football's Journey Through the English Media'. The book, which was published in 2014 by Ockley Books, was described as a 'tour de force' by the Independent on Sunday and shortlisted for the 2015 Lord Aberdare Literary Prize for Sports History. 

Extract

It’s Easter Monday, 2012, and there are 17 minutes left of Newcastle United’s match with Bolton at St James’ Park. What had until that point been a fairly dull, goalless affair sparks into life when the Magpies’ young French star Hatem Ben Arfa receives the ball deep in his own half. Fifteen scintillating seconds later he’s scored and the home side are on their way to three points. While the Toon Army celebrates one of the goals of the season, a wave of panic washes through the Press box as those tasked with writing about the game, myself included, aren’t quite sure what they’d just seen. Had Ben Arfa received the ball from Tim Krul or Yohan Cabaye? Was he in the centre circle or closer to his own goal when he started his run? How many tackles had he ridden? Which Bolton player could have (perhaps should have) brought him down and taken a yellow for the team? We had to wait for the answers. What had caused this panic? Well, due to a power shortage, the TV monitors in the Press box weren’t working. Horror of horrors there were no replays. And there you have it: the media prism through which we experience football has become so omnipotent we almost can’t consume football without it – even newspaper football writers are reliant on replays.

The media dominates our lives. Sport dominates the media. Football dominates the sports media. Think about it: if we’re not watching football on TV from the comfort of our sofa or with our mates in the pub then we’re listening to it on the radio; or we’re talking about it on the radio; or we’re reading about it in newspapers, comics and magazines; or we’re blogging about it; or we’re gambling on it; or we’re collecting football stickers; or we’re tweeting about it; or we’re watching people who write about football talk about what other people who write about football have written about football.

By comparison it’s rare we actually watch the sport live. Even those who do make their way to a ground every Saturday at 3pm (or 12.45pm, or 5.20pm) will most likely then seek an interpretation of what they’ve seen from experts in the media. Almost everyone’s experiences of the teams they don’t support will also be gained vicariously through the media. Such is the power of the media’s coverage of football that in 1990 an Italian operatic aria reached number 2 in the UK singles charts simply because it had been used by the BBC as their signature tune for that summer’s World Cup. The same tournament provided New Order with their only UK number 1. The 1966 World Cup final is still the country’s most watched TV programme. In the regional newspaper industry, which some feel is in slow, terminal decline, football is one of the few areas of content almost guaranteed to provide a huge hike in sales. The Liverpool Echo was up 46% the day after Liverpool lifted the Champions League in 2005 while sales of the city’s Daily Post doubled. Incidentally on the same day The Times sold an extra 70,000 copies. Coincidence? I don’t think so.