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Beyond The Turnstiles by Leon Gladwell

25.00
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Beyond The Turnstiles by Leon Gladwell

25.00

A thorough and valuable tribute to the accidental beauty of football architecture - Bob Stanley

Leon Gladwell has spent a lifetime travelling to over 2,000 grounds capturing every aspect of the beautiful game. From top divisions around Europe to non-league clubs here in England, from the glamour of the Premier League to the understated beauty of a game on the village green, he's seen and photographed it all.

This collection of nearly 500 photos over 270 pages takes you on a tour through the heart of modern football - the highs, the lows, the players, the fans, the volunteers and much more besides. In a world of change, football remains a constant and this book a roadmap.

Featuring companion essays from Stuart Roy Clarke, David Bauckham, Jurgen Vantomme, Pete Miles, Vince Taylor, Mike Latham, Mike Amos MBE, and Stuart Fuller, this is a beautiful look at what lies Beyond The Turnstiles.

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A thorough and valuable tribute to the accidental beauty of football architecture - Bob Stanley

Leon Gladwell has spent a lifetime travelling to over 2,000 grounds capturing every aspect of the beautiful game. From top divisions around Europe to non-league clubs here in England, from the glamour of the Premier League to the understated beauty of a game on the village green, he's seen and photographed it all.

This collection of nearly 500 photos over 270 pages takes you on a tour through the heart of modern football - the highs, the lows, the players, the fans, the volunteers and much more besides. In a world of change, football remains a constant and this book a roadmap.

Featuring companion essays from Stuart Roy Clarke, David Bauckham, Jurgen Vantomme, Pete Miles, Vince Taylor, Mike Latham, Mike Amos MBE, and Stuart Fuller, this is a beautiful look at what lies Beyond The Turnstiles.

Extract taken from Stuart Roy Clarke's Foreword:

When Leon declared (outside of any Court) that the book would NOT be called Grounds for Divorce I suggested it be called Grounds Where I Met My Maker.

Leon has been on an odyssey which he has to try and explain away. In photos. They have authority. They are the format for a classic ‘postcard home’. That’s what these are: “Hi Mum . . . lots of love, your son ever, Leon.” For rationality he has divided his haul into: Stands & Stadiums, Fans, Landscape, Match, Identity and Furniture but he has not done this coldly, in an automated way, but with a sense of roots. He’s not totally sober, he’s a bit giddy yet he’s not drunk. I don’t think he would have spent much time along the way wetting the baby’s head as he would be too excited about what lay around the corner.

By whatever chariot he got to there and there and there, in a sense it’s one big road trip. With missionary zeal. Almost spying, but in a nice way.

My friend, agent A.Csepelyi in deepest Hungary sent me a semaphore some time ago that there was a stadium stirring in the middle of nowhere, in a village of only 1,500 souls, which would boast a capacity of more than 3,000. How can this be justified? But hey, what a stadium . . . It’s in Leon’s book . . . he discovered this for himself. We both came at this Devils Tower via different callings. Ultimately the one calling. These random things in the name of football keep us fuelled all the time.

However decrepit, some grounds just do it for me and yet however lovingly-built a new stadium is – it might not do it for me, or anyone. It’s not a science. It is more scientific why we should love the ground or club closest to where we were spawned. We are fish! I love Brunton Park in Carlisle near where I lived for almost 30 years. For many the trek there and what awaits is a vision of damnation. To me it’s a beautiful green on the edge of The Lake District, Scotland within sight . . . the place where ‘the boys’ I came to holiday with, the players, plied their simple profession including terrible as well as some heroic performances. I am talking Carlisle United. My United. It’s a place dear to many. I have slept in the stand – made it “mine”. It has changed and it will change but it’s in my heart.

My mission doing The Homes of Football has lasted 26 years (all a warm-up I claim) and Leon’s opus is heading for double-figures. Can it ever be a project/study/artwork that is ‘complete’ given that when it appears to end, it all starts again – new seasons, repainted stadia, whole new grounds in the middle of nowhere in Hungary! Leon is keen that I explain in this foreword that he is not a man only of nostalgia – of the old times and grounds – he is rather keen to see what comes next. Keen on what is held up as being better than what went before. For why else would you knock it down unless it fell down of its own accord? Man is hungry to get ‘there’ wherever that should be. Possibly we are ‘there’ already, in the first place!

Possibly Leon’s an idealist who would like a perfect world and then he goes to football and realises this is maybe as good as that world gets. It offers a veritable feast.

So, friend, wander the country and the next, with Leon’s camera, with a focus on a green patch, CALL THAT A STAND? Some floodlights, cue . . . Leon lonely in a field, but for a few sheep, then a flock of fans, becoming a gathering . . . cue the football action: WE HAVE GOT A GAME ON. A game invariably feted and hosted by “a stadium” as if a stadium could be a living thing. For the benefit of this book let’s say it is so. A living thing.

Prepare to meet thy maker. . .